Tag Archive for: Trust

The Children of Fatima

Looking for information about our Radio Encore Broadcast of Fatima – Discovering the Message of Mary?

Podcast Episode

This week’s virtual pilgrimage will be a unique one, join Renee Polka, a member of our Speaker Team, who will share with you the experience of Jacinta – 7 years old, her 9-year-old brother Francisco, and their 10-year-old cousin, Lucia. Three three shepherd children from Fatima, Portugal, witnessed the apparitions in the early 20th century.

During our journey, you will hear about:

  • The children’s interactions with Our Lady
  • Visions which Our Lady revealed to the children and why?
  • Renee’s experience on her visit to Fatima, Portugal

Listen to this program on our podcast feeds starting Thursday, May. 12, on any of the following podcast services:

Listen on Apple Podcasts Listen on Spotify  Listen on Google Podcasts Listen on Breaker Subscribe via RSS Feed


Jewel for the Journey

“Putting up with any sacrifices that are asked of us in our day-to-day lives becomes a slow martyrdom which purifies us and raises us up to the level of the supernatural, through the encounter of our soul with God, in the atmosphere of the presence of the Most Holy Trinity within us. We have here an incomparable spiritual richness!” – Servant of God Lucia Santos


Guest Information

Renee Polka

Renee has a background in education, linguistics, and fundraising. She currently works in the non-profit sector raising funds for community health and wellness initiatives. In 2015, Renee attended the Theology of the Body Institute for the Head and Heart Immersion course with Christopher West, and has taken continuing education courses in theology with Father Nathan Cromly of the St. John Institute. She teaches CCD at St. Brigid Church, in San Antonio, TX.

 


A Closer Look at The Children of Fatima and The Mirace of the Sun:


Where is Fatima, Portugal?

Safe, Protected, and Happy

One beautiful aspect of our human experience is that even the smallest moments can be invitations to reflect on our relationship with God. One such experience was finding our dog named “Friday.”

My wife found a dog walking along the side of the road, in danger of being run over. So, she pulled the car aside and called out for the dog, not knowing if he would listen and come to her. Surprisingly, he followed. This puppy with no chip, no collar, and after weeks of searching, no family, came to be ours by a simple request from my wife, “Come.”

I often think of what may have happened to our dog if my wife didn’t stop and invite him to escape the danger of the road. Maybe he would have been hit by a car, maybe attacked by another animal, homeless, or be put to sleep in a shelter. But now that he followed my wife, he is with us, at our home. He is safe, protected, and happy, and so are we.

You Are Loved

Even that little moment helped me reflect on God’s love. For God calls us, meets us where we are at, and calls us to greater love and communion. I think of my dog and compare myself to him. When I am lost, afraid, not knowing the next steps in life, I think of God meeting me, responding in love to my concerns, and asking me to trust Him completely. Then He simply invites me to follow. I could turn away, keep walking a dangerous path, or I can respond to God’s call and follow Him.

Trusting in the Lord can be difficult, for it requires us at times to abandon the path we are on, to face ridicule, to feel alone from the world. But in our Lord’s loving arms, we find true peace and joy. Nothing in the world can ever satisfy what our hearts desires most: to be united with our creator.

Every day, I’m grateful for God’s invitation to follow Him. As we continue this Lenten journey, I invite you to reflect on the moments in life that help you better understand God’s love.


Daniel Quintero is a newlywed husband, writer, and avid karaoke singer. He currently attends Prince of Peace Catholic Church where he volunteers in the lector ministry and with faith formation. His favorite motto: Awkwardness does not exist

Rising Above The Temptation To Fear

Everyday we encounter numerous temptations. Things from the flesh, the world, and the devil challenge us to better seek Christ and overcome obstacles. One prevalent temptation in today’s time is the temptation to fear. It is interesting how we were in the middle of Lent in 2020 when the covid outbreak started. And now, in 2022, we start lent during the first major conflict between two countries in recent history. There is also fear of the uncertainty of life, of our country, of the economy. In short, it is easy to fear, and there are a lot of good reasons to tempt us in that direction.

You Are Not Alone

How do we overcome the temptation to fear? Trust and humility.

Do we trust that God is in the midst of our sufferings, that He is in the midst of our troubles? God unites himself with us in our struggles of life, allowing His will to be achieved even in the worst of situations. This is why praying the psalms can offer much comfort in that reality.

“Even if I go through the deepest darkness, I will not be afraid, Lord, for you are with me. Your shepherd’s rod and staff protect me.” (Psalm 23:4)

God is with us always, and He is in control. The more we reflect on that, the most we can trust that good will always conquer evil – even if things do not appear that way to us now.

Humility Can Be An Eye Opener

Often our fear comes with the feeling of helplessness. What can we do to fix everything that is wrong in the world? The answer can be found in the examples of numerous saints throughout Church history. We do what we can, and we do it with love. Thus, humility is needed to help us recognize our call of service, but to know that we can only do so much and that God will use that and do even more.

Another answer can be found in our Lord’s prayer: our daily bread. No more, no less, we move one day at a time in hope.

“The secret of happiness is to live moment by moment and to thank God for all that he, in his goodness, sends to us day after day.” – St. Gianna Molla.

So when we continue on the journey of Lent and find ourselves tempted to fear, let us seek to trust Christ by growing in prayer, let us do what we are called to do in our almsgiving and fasting, and let us be in peace that God’s will always be done.


Daniel Quintero is a newlywed husband, writer, and avid karaoke singer. He currently attends Prince of Peace Catholic Church where he volunteers in the lector ministry and with faith formation. His favorite motto: Awkwardness does not exist. 

National Shrine of Divine Mercy – Stockbridge, MA

Come on a journey with Angela Sealana to The National Shrine of the Divine Mercy in Stockbridge, MA! To help guide us on our spiritual pilgrimage is the rector of the shrine, Fr. Anthony Gramlich, MIC.

During this spiritual pilgrimage, we will:

  • Address the question of God’s mercy; Does God really forgive me? Why do we often struggle with forgiveness and our relationship with God, and how can we embrace God’s mercy for us and for others?
  • Hear the amazing story of how the message of God’s mercy was given to us in modern times through a very special diary, and the miraculous journey of how it made its way from Poland during World War II all the way to Massachusetts!
  • Learn how the National Shrine of the Divine Mercy came to be established, what it’s like, and what pilgrims can experience there.

For more information on The National Shrine of the Divine Mercy, click here to visit their website.

Featured Images captured from the Official Facebook Page for The National Shrine of the Divine Mercy.


Listen to this program now:


Jewel for the Journey:

ABCs of Divine Mercy: Ask for Mercy, Be Merciful, and Completely trust in Jesus.


A Closer Look at The National Shrine of the Divine Mercy:

Image courtesy of The National Shrine of the Divine Mercy. All rights reserved.


Where is The National Shrine of the Divine Mercy?

Having Faith Even When We Do Not “See”

How do you start your day? Perhaps you are an early riser who goes for a brisk walk and knocks out tasks before the sun rises.  Or maybe you hit the snooze button a “few” times and rely on some brisk coffee to get you going. As for me, I must pray! The minute I wake up, I say good morning to God and thank him for another day.  I also say a morning offering prayer:

Dear Lord, I do not know what will happen to me today. I only know that nothing will happen that was not foreseen by You, and directed to my greater good from all eternity. I adore Your holy and unfathomable plans, and submit to them with all my heart for love of You, the Pope, and the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Amen.

This helps me start my day with a fresh reminder that things will happen according to God’s will, not mine.  As the day progresses and things happen, I constantly remind myself that I may not understand why something is happening but I must always trust!  This is how I have faith when I don’t see (which, honestly, is most of the time).  Like everyone, I have good days and bad days and I frequently encounter uncertainties and less than ideal situations. But knowing that God loves me, created me, and has a plan for me fills my heart with joy and peace even on the toughest of days.

O you of little faith

Of course, it’s been a journey for me to get to this place in my own faith.  And the journey of my faith is far from over as it will last through my last day in this world.  But there were certainly times in the past when I worried about so many things.  Too often I feared what I couldn’t see or understand.  I can recall worrying about pretty much everything: whether my plans would work out, worrying about whether I would get selected for a certain job, worrying about ailments. I can recall losing sleep and feeling anxious as the worry consumed me.  Reflecting on it, I can totally compare it to the parable The Calming of the Storm at Sea.

“He got into a boat and his disciples followed him. Suddenly a violent storm came upon the sea so that the boat was being swamped by waves; but he was asleep. They came and woke him, saying, Lord, save us! We are perishing! He said to them, Why are you terrified, O you of little faith? Then he got up, rebuked the winds and the sea, and there was great calm. The men were amazed and said, What sort of man is this, whom even the winds and the sea obey? “(Matthew 8: 23-27)

Other perspectives

This is only my perspective – an adult, a catholic mother, and a wife.  As I pondered on this, I was eager to find out other perspectives.  So, I interviewed my family. I met with them individually and asked:

How do you keep your faith in God even when you do not see?

You can read their responses below:

  • Retirement age: “I know in my heart that there is only one place to go. What’s down the road is something in God’s plan.  He is our only recourse. He is our present help even if we do not see.  You know in your heart.  That’s it.”
  • School-age: “Mostly it’s that you feel God in your heart.  And you could hear him in your ears saying ‘trust me, you’re not alone’ and telling you ‘I am right here beside you.’”
  • Preschool age: “When I pray to God, um, I feel him in my heart pumping.  It pumps like this: pump, pump, pump!”
  • Toddler age: “He comes in your heart and Jesus wants us to share.”

It’s touching how remarkably similar these responses are!

Your perspective

How do you keep your faith in God even when you do not see?

I pray that all brothers and sisters in Christ feel in their hearts the peace and joy of God’s plan!

Trust in him always, especially in the darkest of times.

Leaving you with this perfect excerpt from the Beatitudes:

Blessed are the pure at heart, for they shall see God!


Christina Campos is a blessed Catholic wife and mother. Each day brings adventurous memories and so many reasons to be thankful to God. She enjoys volunteering and contributing to the special mission of the Pilgrim Center of Hope.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

Amidst Chaos: Simple but Powerful Steps to Peace & Trust In God

I remember a few years ago, standing in the Southwest Airlines ticket line at the San Antonio airport. My husband and I were eagerly awaiting our flight to a family get-together.

But our mood was disturbed as a woman furiously pulled her luggage into the line behind us.  From her loud phone conversation, we immediately knew that her flight home had been cancelled due to tornado warnings elsewhere. After hanging up, she began spewing expletives into our shared air, seemingly unaware of the folks around her.

My annoyance turned to sadness for this woman, when she (angrily) revealed to an agent that she had an ill family member at home, with whom she needed to be present.

Whether by a trip to the airport, the grocery store, a walk around our neighborhood, or even staying home and scrolling the Internet, it’s easy to see how chaotic our lives can become. People get sick, accidents happen, tasks need accomplishing, not to mention injustices in our communities…

As life piles up, how can we maintain peace and trust in God?

At several points in the Gospel, Jesus’ disciples think they’ve got it made. We get it now, they say. We understand you and your message now!

But Jesus hands them a reality check:

Do you believe now?
Behold, the hour is coming and has arrived
when each of you will be scattered to his own home
and you will leave me alone.
But I am not alone, because the Father is with me.
I have told you this so that you might have peace in me.
In the world you will have trouble,
but take courage, I have conquered the world.

Sometimes when we feel strong in faith, we get a reality check: something doesn’t go according to plan, and we panic.

Waving the White Flag?

Look at our first pope, Peter.

  • As guards arrested Jesus, Peter fought back; cutting off a man’s ear!
  • Afterwards, he tried to escape the situation; denying three times that he ever knew Jesus.
  • At the Crucifixion, Peter was nowhere to be found.

What happened to Peter later in life, so that he finally had peace amid chaos? How was he finally able to “take courage” and face his own persecutors and death?

Peter learned to surrender.

That word invokes negative connotations. “Surrender” seemingly epitomizes weakness… and who wants to be weak? Yet, the centrality of surrender amid suffering is the message that Peter hammers home in his letters, which are now books of our Bible (1 and 2 Peter).

Why surrender? My spiritual director once instructed me to read a spiritual classic: Self-Abandonment to Divine Providence, by Father Jean-Pierre de Caussade. Its author directly addresses our desire to fight or escape God’s will:

If that which God Himself chooses for you does not content you, from whom do you expect to obtain what you desire? If you are disgusted with the meat prepared for you by the divine will itself, what food would not be insipid to so depraved a taste? No soul can be really nourished, fortified, purified, enriched, and sanctified except in fulfilling the duties of the present moment. What more would you have? As in this you can find all good, why seek it elsewhere? Do you know better than God? As he ordains it thus why do you desire it differently? Can His wisdom and goodness be deceived?

Wow. In what we could call the “School of Surrender,” the first step to maintaining peace is to see my daily life as a personalized gift from an All-Good, All-Loving, Most-Wise and All-Powerful God.

If my day is filled with challenges, I have to trust that I’ve been offered resources & graces tailor-made to overcome those challenges. As my day is peppered with good things, surrendering means trusting that God has also willed those good things exactly for me at that moment.

What a source of joy!

Finding Peace

Here at the Pilgrim Center of Hope, we deal with a number of challenges. Amidst them all, we gather each day in Gethsemane Chapel with our CEO (the Lord Jesus). We begin with a Consecration to the Holy Spirit recommended by Archbishop Gustavo Garcia-Siller. We pray, “O Holy Spirit… I surrender myself to You…”

Let’s make an effort to address our own daily ways of “fighting” or “escaping from” the everyday situations entrusted personally to us by our loving, Heavenly Father. What will we choose to do; complain? drag our feet? ignore some duty that we know is best for us? escape through many hours of entertainment?

Instead of complaining, let’s choose to praise God: “Thank you, Father, Jesus, Holy Spirit, for being with me at this moment.”

Instead of dragging our feet, let’s stand confidently in the graces that God has given us.

Instead of ignoring our duty, let’s ask the Holy Spirit to turn our eyes to face what is before us with courage.

Instead of escaping, let’s ask Jesus to take us by his hands that were pierced as a promise of his love and constant presence.

Come, Holy Spirit.  Help me to find peace in surrender.


Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life.

Angela Sealana is Media Coordinator for Pilgrim Center of Hope, having served at the apostolate since 2010. She also serves on the PCH Speaker Team.

Finding Joy, Faith & Hope In Any Situation

Some Context

In Sunday’s Gospel, Jesus compared the kingdom of heaven to a treasure, and to a pearl of great price. When they are discovered, the one who finds them sells all he has to acquire them. The point is not the value of the treasure or of the pearl, but of the kingdom of heaven, which leads us to the last comparison; the net thrown into the sea. At the end of the age, all humanity will be gathered together; some will be invited into the kingdom of heaven and others will not.

As Jesus says in another place, “Where ever your treasure is, so also will your heart be” (Matthew 6:21). Those to whom the kingdom of heaven was of primary importance during their life and who were faithful witnesses of their love for God and neighbor will receive their treasure in heaven.

What To Seek

In the first reading, we see that Solomon answered wisely when God offered to give him whatever he asked for. When he asked for an understanding heart so that he could serve God and His people better, God was pleased. In his heart, Solomon was not far from the kingdom of heaven.

It was as if he was prophesying what Jesus would tell us in the Gospel of Matthew: “Seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things will be given you besides” (Matthew 6:33). These words from Jesus are the light that will guide us into his kingdom. They are the fulfillment of the Two Greatest Commandments; we must love the Lord Our God with all our mind, heart, soul, and strength and our neighbor as ourself. When we order our lives toward God, the kingdom of heaven is at hand.

So we must ask ourselves, where is our treasure? What are you willing to give everything you have for? In what are you investing?

How to Find the Treasure

One resource that we all have equally is time. Everyone of us has 24 hours each day, and how we use that time has a great deal to do with our proximity to the kingdom of heaven. All we need to make an eternal investment is our intellect and our free will.

I remember Fr. Bruce Nieli, a Paulist priest who used to live in Austin, telling us that when he was going through a difficult time he would visit a friend who was a quadriplegic. He said, this man, though handicapped was always filled with joy because of his love of God and his great prayer life. Joy does not mean the absence of difficulty; it means having great faith and trust that in the end “… all things work for good for those who love God…” as Paul tells us in the second reading (Romans 8:28).

I have heard people say they do not have time to pray. What is it that you are doing that you can do on your own without God’s help? It is His love that allows us to take our next breath. There is a saying, “No prayer means no faith,” because prayer is our connection to God. Without faith, we have no hope.

Perhaps it could be said that the kingdom of heaven is like the prayer of a faithful person, because it always puts us in the company of God. Jesus said, “Wherever two or more are gathered in my name, there I am in the midst of them” (Matthew 18:20). When we pray, we are always at least in the company of our Guardian Angel.

Make the Commitment

It is especially our commitment to daily prayer and to the sacraments of reconciliation and the Holy Eucharist that keep us invested into eternal life and help us to reach our greatest happiness on earth. Prayer and the sacraments help us to be better husbands, wives, parents, children, etc. Whatever is most dear to our hearts is best protected by prayer and the sacraments of the Church.

Jesus closes this Gospel by asking, “Do you understand all these things?” Like Solomon, let us pray for the gift of understanding, but also for the greater gift of believing; because by faith we are often called to believe that which we cannot understand. The Scriptures and the Church will guide us into the kingdom of heaven if we believe what has been revealed to us, and then act on what we believe.

If you want to be close to the kingdom of heaven, make a commitment to spend time close to Jesus in his Eucharistic Presence in the Blessed Sacrament chapel. You’ll be glad you did.


Deacon Tom FoxK.H.S. is Co-Founder & Co-Director of Pilgrim Center of Hope with his wife, Mary Jane Fox. The two left their careers after a profound conversion experience and began working full-time in ministry at their parish in 1986. After several years and having impacted tens of thousands of families, the Foxes founded Pilgrim Center of Hope in 1993 as a response to the Church’s call for a New Evangelization. Deacon Tom is an invested member of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem, a Knight of the Holy Sepulchre.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

When We Ask God, “Why?”

Were not our hearts burning within us while he spoke to us on the way and opened the Scriptures to us? (Luke 24:32)

The death of Jesus on the cross was fresh in the minds of his disciples. They thought all was lost. They knew he was dead and buried, but forgot that he had prophesied that he would rise from the dead. The reality of what they saw and knew to be true prevented them from seeing that what had taken place was the fulfillment of the Scriptures and the very words of Jesus himself.

The Stumbling Block

Our human logic is necessary to make rational decisions, but sometimes logic must give way to faith. It is not logical that God would become human so that he could be tortured and killed by humans to save us from our sins, and indeed this is still a stumbling block for millions of people who refuse to believe.

For millions, even some Christians, it isn’t logical that Jesus loves us so much that he established the priesthood and the Holy Eucharist so that we can receive him body, blood, soul and divinity in Holy Communion during the Holy Mass. Even some of his disciples refused to follow him when he told them they must eat his flesh and drink his blood if they were to have eternal life. So that there could be no confusion, he repeated this message four times. The disciples that remained with him did not understand the teaching either, but their faith in Jesus was stronger than their need to understand. As Peter said, “Master, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life. We have come to believe and are convinced that you are the Holy One of God.”

Finding An Answer

Life is a mystery, and we all will be confronted by situations and circumstances we do not understand. We all have asked and will ask, “why.” The answer can be found in our purpose for being on this earth. We are here to know, love, and serve God so that we can be happy for all eternity.

If we don’t like that answer, we should read the lives of the saints who found their purpose and their happiness in their faithful relationship with God. Many of them died young, lived in poverty with poor health, and suffered many trials. Some of the saints were kings, doctors, lawyers, farmers, husbands, wives, children, and from every walk of life. And yet their hearts burned with love for God because they entered into a personal relationship with him that was more important than anything else in their lives and they experienced great peace and happiness.

Jesus longs for everyone of us to experience that same peace and happiness. No matter who we are or what we have done, Jesus reveals his Sacred Heart to us and desires that we come to him to experience his mercy right now, without hesitation. When we surrender our hearts to the heart of Jesus, we can be confident he will give us the grace we need for every situation, even if we have to suffer for a time.

Jesus, set my heart on fire for love of you! Jesus, I trust in you!


Deacon Tom FoxK.H.S. is Co-Founder & Co-Director of Pilgrim Center of Hope with his wife, Mary Jane Fox. The two left their careers after a profound conversion experience and began working full-time in ministry at their parish in 1986. After several years and having impacted tens of thousands of families, the Foxes founded Pilgrim Center of Hope in 1993 as a response to the Church’s call for a New Evangelization. Deacon Tom is an invested member of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem, a Knight of the Holy Sepulchre.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

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