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Why We Cannot Be Complacent In Our Spiritual Lives

In celebrating the Solemnity or Feast of Christ the King this past Sunday, which also happened to be the last Sunday of the liturgical year, I couldn’t help but want to assess my spiritual progress since the Advent of 2018.

As to how I measure my progress, each year in acknowledging the kingship of Jesus Christ, I recommit to the following:

  • Dedicating myself to a more active prayer life
  • Being more effective in serving my family members, friends, parish, and community
  • Bringing hope to others (those I encounter on my journey) as an evangelizer

Whenever I find myself getting complacent, falling into a routine or falling short, I remember this beautiful quote that I discovered a few years back:

The Kingdom Demands Discipleship
Jesus is the center of creation; and so, the attitude demanded of us as true believers is that of recognizing and accepting in our lives the centrality of Jesus Christ, in our thoughts, in our words, and in our works. – Homily of Pope Francis, Solemnity of Christ the King, November 24, 2013

Perhaps the main thing that drives me, which can possibly help you stay active and on course in your faith, is this truth.

A couple of years ago, after making a confession that was filled with what I recall were more failures than normal, my spiritual director asked me, “Do you know who you are?” I think I said something like a child of God or part of the Body of Christ. Whatever I said, it wasn’t the right answer or the answer he was looking for.

That’s when he said, Like Christ the King, you are priest, prophet, and king. If you truly believed and understood this, you would be inspired to always practice your faith with more boldness, passion, and joy.

Your Threefold Calling

  1. A priest should embody and reflect the presence of God. In order to do so, we should have a devotion to prayer, the sacraments, and the Mass.
  2. A person is a prophet in the measure that he or she bears the truth of God. G.K. Chesterton said that in an upside-down world such as ours, the prophet is the person who speaks the truth according to Scripture, the lives of the saints, and Church teaching. If we are to be beacons of light to others, we must keep growing in our knowledge of the faith. In our increasingly secularized society, we can look to classic authors like Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, the Venerable Fulton Sheen and others.  A prophet can never stop studying and speaking.
  3. Finally, what does it mean for the ordinary Catholic to live out our sharing in Christ’s kingship? It means to be a leader in guiding your community toward God in service and stewardship.

When you are fully conscious of your personal dignity in God, complacency is not an option.


Robert V. Rodriguez is Public Relations & Outreach Assistant for Pilgrim Center of Hope. He combines a passion for the Catholic faith together with years of professional experience as a TV news journalist, video producer, and PR/marketing specialist. Robert also serves as Chairman for our annual “Master, I Want to See” Catholic Men’s Conference.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

The Spark: How to Succeed When Failing

It is not unusual to be asked, “What are you living for?”  But, what would you say if someone asked you, “What are you dying for?”

The Catechism of the Catholic Church answers, “The Christian who unites his own death to that of Jesus views it as a step towards him and an entrance into everlasting life” (no. 1020).

Our answer to both questions is Jesus!

We should be looking forward to the day of our death even as we live, to ensure that day is many years to come. As St. Augustine said, “Take care of your body as if you were going to live forever; and take care of your soul as if you are going to die tomorrow.”

Because Jesus became one of us by being “born of a woman” (Galatians 4:4) and thereby sanctified humanity, our life is not to be just a waiting until we die nor is it a living only for this life. Rather, we are to live as a sign of contradiction; the more we die to Christ the more fully human and alive we become. We achieve this transformation through God’s gift of grace, which was merited for us through the Passion of our Lord Jesus Christ.

The Spark

Grace is the power of God at work in us. Father Wojciech Giertych, O.P., Theologian of the Papal Household, teaches that we can ignite and move this grace through human acts, which he calls, “The Spark of Faith.”

Father Giertych uses the example of the hemorrhaging woman from the Gospel of Luke (8:43-48). He explains that when Jesus says, “Someone has touched me; for I know that power has gone out from me,” this exchange of grace from Jesus to the woman was achieved because of the woman’s act of faith. Her touching of his tassel caused the spark that ignited and moved grace from Jesus into this woman, restoring her to health. Jesus acknowledges this spark she caused with his words, “Daughter, your faith has saved you; go in peace.”

We see from the hemorrhaging woman that an act of faith is not only our prayers. Any human movement, physical, mental or spiritual, in which we honor God’s gift of our creation sparks grace. Here are just a few examples:

  • Taking care of our bodies by eating nutritious foods and maintaining a healthy balance in exercise, recreation, work and rest, to keep ourselves fit and free of illness and disease.
  • Increasing our knowledge of the wonders of the world, honing our talents, and learning new skills, in order to expand our abilities and intellect.
  • Living in community with others by following Jesus’ teaching to treat others as we would like to be treated.
  • Growing in virtue and practicing morality.
  • Seeking a closer relationship with God by living the sacramental life of the Church through participating at Holy Mass, meditating on his Word in Scripture, regular confession in the Sacrament of Reconciliation and spending time with our Lord in Adoration.
  • Offering our sufferings by joining them to Christ for our salvation and the salvation of others.
  • And yes, praying daily; be it through Scripture, the Rosary, devotional prayers, speaking from the heart, silent contemplation.

But what if we fail?

What if, instead of honoring God and acting in faith, we act selfishly?

This can serve to be even more successful in stirring up grace! Father Giertych explains, “What is decisive, however, is the repeated returning to God.” In using the example of distraction in prayer, Father says, “Such mangled prayer, in which there are multiple returns, is very fruitful, because the living faith is expressed several times, and it is faith that opens to grace.”

Just as with the power that flowed from Jesus to the hemorrhaging woman, Father says, “This perseverance in faith ensures an immediate encounter with Jesus.” Wow!

At Pilgrim Center of Hope we like to say, “You do not have to be perfect to begin anew in Christ.” As we make our journey to Eternity, let us never miss the opportunity to begin anew to ignite grace when we stumble or downright fail to act in faith. Let us turn immediately back to God so that, like St. Paul, we can one day proclaim,

“I have competed well; I have finished the race; have kept the faith. From now on the crown of righteousness awaits me, which the Lord, the just judge, will award to me on that day, and not only to me, but to all who have longed for his appearance” (2 Timothy 4:7-8.)


Nan Balfour is a grateful Catholic whose greatest desire is to make our Lord Jesus more loved. She seeks to accomplish this through her vocation to womanhood, marriage, motherhood and as a writer, speaker and events coordinator for Pilgrim Center of Hope.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

Why Pray?

When it comes to prayer and why we should take every opportunity to utilize this open line of communication to God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit… I will never forget what Fr. Adolph Koehler, O.M.I. told our fifth-grade class at St. Mary’s School.

He started with a question, “What would you give to possess the key that unlocks all the treasures that God wants to give you?”

The answers ranged from large sums of money to various prized possessions; the boys offered their football card collections, G.I. Joe action figures & vehicles, and even a mini-bike. The girls offered up their Barbies, Easy Bake Ovens, and at least one above ground swimming pool.

And then came Fr. Koehler’s gem of wisdom, “Because God loves us so much, he has placed the key that unlocks all his treasures in our hands. The key to God’s treasures is our prayers!”

Talk about a mind-blowing moment! It was genius. The analogy is so perfect that it has stuck with me for over 40 years.

Keep It Simple

Don’t make yourself crazy trying to figure out what prayer is all about, especially if you are starting out or struggling with praying regularly.

St. Pope John Paul II, in writing about how to pray, said it was simple, “Pray any way you like, so long as you pray.”

St. Jane Frances de Chantal encouraged people not to overthink prayer; otherwise it can be perceived as a burden. “The greatest secret is to go to our prayer in good faith & in all simplicity.”

And then there is this from St. Augustine, a sinful man who was transformed by prayer into a beloved saint: “Our progress in holiness, exactly corresponds to our progress in the spirit of prayer; he who prays well lives well.”

The words of the saints and Fr. Koehler’s great analogy all point to the idea that prayer calls for confidence, familiarity, and humility.

The Benefits

The immediate benefit of prayer is that it leads us away from sin and toward salvation. The more we turn to God, the more we receive direction from the Holy Spirit. Through prayer, we grow in the virtues of faith, hope, and charity; which in turn lead us to grow in our prayer life and relationship with God.

The treasures await; we just have to use our key!

As a way of bookending this reflection on why we should pray, I will leave you with a quote filled with several great analogies. The Venerable Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen once exclaimed,

Why should we pray? Why breathe? We have to take in fresh air and get rid of bad air; we have to take in new power and get rid of old weaknesses. We pray because we are orchestras and always need to tune-up. Just as a battery sometimes runs down and needs to be charged so we have to be renewed in spiritual vigor. Our blessed Lord said, ‘Without Me you can do nothing.’

If you would like to learn more about prayer, we invite you to visit us at our peaceful place in northwest San Antonio. Spiritual tools and resources are available. Discover our Gethsemane Chapel, outdoor Stations of the Cross, and life-size crucifix & fisherman’s boat. Come and see!


Robert V. Rodriguez is Public Relations & Outreach Assistant for Pilgrim Center of Hope. He combines a passion for the Catholic faith together with years of professional experience as a TV news journalist, video producer, and PR/marketing specialist. Robert also serves as Chairman for our annual “Master, I Want to See” Catholic Men’s Conference.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

Teach Me to Pray the Cross!

The young medical assistant saw my olive wood carved, hand-size crucifix lying by my hospital bed. He picked it up with enthusiasm and asked if I would teach him to pray with the Cross.

After a recent accidental fall, I was hospitalized to surgically mend a fractured ankle. The crucifix, from Jerusalem, became a visible sign of hope for me. Jesus died on the Cross for us; it was a reminder of his love and mercy.

He Did Not Know

As the young man picked up the crucifix, he shared with me his observations of Christians who would venerate the Crucifix and wondered why it meant so much to them.

The other medical assistant with him commented, “He is Moslem!”

Nevertheless, he was so interested to learn “the prayer of the Cross,” as he expressed it. I thought, how am I to explain the Sign of the Cross, a prayer passed on from the 4th century to one who isn’t Christian? At the same time, I was so impressed this young man felt comfortable asking me about the Crucifix. After seeing the expression on his face—eager to learn something sacred, I was encouraged to show him.

Sharing My Faith

As I held the Crucifix in my hand, I held it in front of me. Looking upward, I began:

“God, the Father in Heaven—Allah, who is Great, sent his son Jesus to show us his love. Jesus died on the Cross for us; and sent his Holy Spirit, to be with us always.”

As I continued, I placed the crucifix on my forehead, moved it to my heart, and then left to right; finishing with an Amen as I kissed the Cross. I added, “It is a sign of hope! A sign of God’s love!” Again, I repeated the prayer of the Cross: “In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, Amen!”

The young man asked for the Crucifix, and repeated the prayer as he repeated the movements himself.

Shortly after, another medical assistant entered the hospital room and the young man told the other assistant, “I just learned to pray with the Cross!” and made the Sign of the Cross over the assistant with the prayers he had just learned!

I did see this young man again during my hospital stay, he remembered the prayer!

A Sign of Hope

I was delighted for this young man.

The olive wood crucifix is one I hold each day when I pray. It is a sign of consolation and hope, reminding me that whatever cross I am experiencing, I can gaze upon the One who laid down his life for me, and remember that I can be united with Him in all things!

Do we have signs of our faith in Christ displayed in our lives? Whether it be at home, workplace, or wearing a crucifix? Would we be ready to give an explanation for our sign of faith?

Think about having one you can hold and pray; a reminder of his mercy, his presence.

St. Cyril of Jerusalem (d. 386) in his Catechetical Lectures stated,

Let us then not be ashamed to confess the Crucified. Be the cross our seal, made with boldness by our fingers on our brow and in everything; over the bread we eat and the cups we drink, in our comings and in our goings out; before our sleep, when we lie down and when we awake; when we are traveling, and when we are at rest (Catecheses, 13).


Mary Jane Fox, D.H.S. is Co-Founder & Co-Director of Pilgrim Center of Hope with her husband, Deacon Tom Fox. The two left their careers after a profound conversion experience and began working full-time in ministry at their parish in 1986. After several years and having impacted tens of thousands of families, the Foxes founded Pilgrim Center of Hope in 1993 as a response to the Church’s call for a New Evangelization. Mary Jane is an invested member of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem, a Dame of the Holy Sepulchre.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

San Antonio 2019 Rosary Congress

SAN ANTONIO – Pilgrim Center of Hope is honored to provide speakers from its Speaker Team for San Antonio’s annual Rosary Congress.

The 2019 Diocesan Traveling Rosary Congress will begin October 5 and conclude on October 11, seven days of around-the-clock Eucharistic Adoration and hourly praying of the Rosary in response to Our Lady of Fatima’s call to conversion, consecration, and prayer.

SCHEDULE – Traveling activities at various Catholic Churches within the Archdiocese of San Antonio territory:

October 5
Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Selma
5:30pm – Opening Mass with Archbishop Gustavo Garcia-Siller, MSpS
7:00pm – Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet begins

October 6
Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Selma
Continuing all-day Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary, Divine Mercy Chaplet
Note: These devotions will pause during scheduled Masses

October 7
Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Selma
Continuing all-day Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary, Divine Mercy Chaplet
Note: These devotions will pause during scheduled Masses
7:00pm – Talk on “Power of the Rosary” by Deacon Ed Domowski

Church of the Holy Spirit
7:30am – Mass
8:00am – Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet begins

October 8
Church of the Holy Spirit
Continuing round-the-clock Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary, Divine Mercy Chaplet until 7am
7:30am Mass

St. Margaret Mary Church
8:00am – Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet begins
6:00pm – Mass

St. Helena Church
6:00pm – Mass
7:00pm – Talk on “Mary’s Gifts” by Victor Negron followed by…
Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet

October 9
St. Helena Church
Continuing round-the-clock Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary, Divine Mercy Chaplet until 6:00pm

Christ the King Church
6:00pm – Mass
7:00pm – Talk on “Marian Apparitions” by Renee Polka followed by…
Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet (through October 10 at 6:00pm)

St. Monica, Converse
7:00pm – Mass
7:30pm – Talk on “Consecration to Jesus through Mary” by Alexandra Kubebatu followed by…
Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet (through October 10 at 6:00pm)

October 10
Christ the King Church
Continuing round-the-clock Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary, Divine Mercy Chaplet until 6:00pm

St. Monica, Converse
Continuing round-the-clock Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary, Divine Mercy Chaplet until 6:00pm

Sts. Peter & Paul, New Braunfels
12:10pm (afternoon) – Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet begins (through October 11 at 7:00pm)

October 11
Sts. Peter & Paul, New Braunfels
Continuing round-the-clock Eucharistic Adoration, Hourly Rosary, Divine Mercy Chaplet until 7:00pm
7:00pm – Talk on “Consecration to Jesus through Mary” by Alexandra Kubebatu


For more information, contact the organizer: Diocesan Rosary Congresses.

Approaching Life Transitions – A Quick Guide for Christians

During this month, many of us are experiencing transitions in our lives – whether related to school, work, home, family, or even the simple changing of the seasons.

Transitions can be exciting as well as difficult. How are we as Christians called & empowered to approach these challenges?

Looking At Jesus

The most obvious and triumphant transition that Jesus Christ experienced was in his passion, death, and resurrection. Consider how the Gospel depicts Jesus after his resurrection; retaining his wounds of crucifixion (cf. John 20: 25, 27). If we had been present at the crucifixion, those wounds would have been difficult to look at. After the Resurrection, Jesus offers those once-ugly wounds to the apostles for examination. Now, they see that these wounds are beautiful signs of God’s love and triumph.

When we enter into a new phase of life, we do not totally leave behind our past, and it may be difficult to see what good can come from this new challenge. However, when we entrust ourselves to God, our past can be redeemed and give God glory. What was once ugly can mysteriously become beautiful.

All things work for good for those who love God, who are called according to his purpose. (Romans 8:28)

Freedom In True Humility

A powerful truth is embodied by Christ’s passion, death, and resurrection: Only when we offer ourselves naked—with all defenses stripped away—before God and others; accepting the reality of our frailty, woundedness, and weakness, yet in the light of God’s mighty love, can we experience the Kingdom of God and life in the Holy Spirit.

That is true humility; seeing ourselves as God sees us!

When we outstretch our arms, like Jesus on the cross, to embrace the challenges that lie ahead in our daily pilgrimage of life, and only when we shed all the masks we wear; can we recognize how much God loves us, how highly God thinks of us and how greatly God believes in us!

Striving to Follow Christ In Transition

In his later years, Pope St. John Paul II conveyed his humility through his physical vulnerability. Rather than shying away from the public, he allowed others to see his frailty. Pope Benedict XVI demonstrated his humility by making the unprecedented decision to resign the fullness of religious power to live in seclusion and quiet.

During a General Audience in 2016, Pope Francis remarked, “It is enough to respond to the call with a humble and sincere heart. The Church is not a community of perfect people, but of disciples on a journey, who follow the Lord because they know they are sinners and in need of his pardon.”

Taking the Next Steps

I came so that they might have life and have it more abundantly. (John 10:10)

To help you face your next life transition or challenge, here are a few concrete things that can help you approach it with humility:

  1. Make a list of things for which you are grateful. At times, we approach a new challenge as if it depends entirely on our efforts. While we should always strive to serve God and others to the best of our ability, we are not the world’s savior! Spending time to write out a multitude of things God and others have given you, will remind you of the bigger picture.
  2. Spend some quiet time in prayer. Our minds need quieting from time to time, so as to recognize our true selves amidst the noise and demands of the world. A simple start is to pray a Hail Mary and end with: “Blessed Mother Mary, help me to see God’s love for me today.”
  3. Seek the Sacrament of Reconciliation. The point of this sacrament is not to tear you down, but to build you up. Within this encounter, we can shed all those masks & accumulated layers of pretense. See not only your areas of weakness, but ultimately how precious and what a gift you are in God’s eyes!

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life.

Angela Sealana is Media Coordinator for Pilgrim Center of Hope, having served at the apostolate for nearly 10 years. She also serves on the PCH Speaker Team.

What Is the Solution to All the Problems In Our Lives?

In the past few weeks, I have experienced some unexpected challenges. After receiving a disappointing phone call, I put down my phone and sighed, “Jesus, I trust in You,” for I know from Scripture and from personal experience, God works everything for the good (Romans 8:28).

Even though we may know we can trust him, persevering confidently in God’s trust until we can witness the good can be very difficult. It is precisely in these out-of-our-control situations that we are called to act in faith and discipline ourselves to not withdraw into our fears. Instead, we are to order our thoughts toward and prioritize our gaze on God and on his fatherly providence and protection.

With burdens weighing me down, I kneel in front of our Lord in his Eucharistic Presence in a parish’s Adoration Chapel. As I look up at the Lord enthroned in the monstrance, a thought is allowed into my mind: ‘I am putting all my trust into a little piece of bread.’

Immediately comes the counter-attack, ‘No, you’re not! You are putting your trust into the Creator of the Universe who died on the Cross so that you could have eternal life and in Whose great kindness condescends to become present in a little piece of bread so that you may enter into his life here and now!’

This truth comes by privilege of placing myself before the very presence of God in which no lie can stand.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church (paragraph 1380) states,

[…] In his Eucharistic presence he remains mysteriously in our midst as the one who loved us and gave himself up for us, and he remains under signs that express and communicate this love:

The Church and the world have a great need for Eucharistic worship. Jesus awaits us in this sacrament of love. Let us not refuse the time to go to meet him in adoration, in contemplation full of faith, and open to making amends for the serious offenses and crimes of the world. Let our adoration never cease.

It is important in our world with so many anxieties, inconveniences and things just not going our way to spend quality time with our Lord in prayer every day. It is even better, if we place ourselves in his Presence through Holy Mass (at least every Sunday) and in Eucharistic Adoration, as often as we can.

We find confirmation of this path through the life of Saint Alphonsus Liguori. He experienced suspicion from civil authorities and betrayal by a fellow priest. In the face of people and situations out of his control, this humble man chose to bring it all to the One who orders all things and controls all things. He writes, “If you desire to find him immediately, see he is quite close to you. Tell him what you desire, for it is to console you and grant your prayer that he remains in the tabernacle.” Pope Saint John Paul II simply says, “In that little Host is the solution to all the problems of the world.”

And, of course, there is the Virgin Mary, the exemplar of constancy to God!

In just a few days, we will be celebrating her Assumption into Heaven. Her eternal reward follows a lifetime of perseverance, putting the priority of God’s will before her own, discipline to remain close to Jesus through the temporal obstacles, and a vigilance to dare to believe that what God revealed to her in prayer would be realized.

Take advantage of this great feast day and holy day of obligation by celebrating the Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary on August 15. Make this the first of many frequent encounters with Christ in his Eucharistic Presence. Ask his Mother to help you persevere as she did.


Nan Balfour is a grateful Catholic whose greatest desire is to make our Lord Jesus more loved. She seeks to accomplish this through her vocation to womanhood, marriage, motherhood and as a writer, speaker and events coordinator for Pilgrim Center of Hope

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

What Effect Does the Lord’s Prayer Have?

What is prayer and why should we pray? We saw in Sunday’s Gospel that even Jesus, the Son of God, spent time in prayer. When his disciples ask him to teach them to pray, Jesus teaches them what we call the Lord’s Prayer. Here in the gospel according to Luke, we have an abbreviation of the prayer we are familiar with from Matthew – the prayer we pray together at every Mass and many other times throughout the day.

Are we really aware of the importance of what we are saying and of the far-reaching effects of this prayer?

Jesus tells us to pray: “Father, hallowed be thy name”

Prayer is first of all a relationship with Our Father in heaven who loves us, is interested in our good, and is near to us. He is the Father of all humanity, but especially of us who have been baptized and call ourselves his children. We are not praying to an unknown god who is far away from us. When we say hallowed be thy name, we are acknowledging that God is holy, almighty; the creator of all things and we are his lowly creatures. We should praise God every day throughout the day for his benevolence. He is our Father now and for all eternity, and he wants a personal, intimate relationship with each of us, so that we may know his goodness and experience his goodness.

“…your kingdom come”

In the prayer we are familiar with from Matthew, we add, “Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.”

The Kingdom of God is at hand when we do the will of God. God has a great plan for humanity, and has revealed that plan through the Scriptures and the Church. We reach our potential for happiness in this life when we discover the specific plan God has for each of us by asking for his help every day in prayer and by keeping the commandments he has given us to guide us in the right direction.

“Give us each day our daily bread…”

Whether we are aware of it or not, we are dependent upon God even for our next breath. It is God who keeps everything in existence. Everything we have is a gift from Him and He expects us to be good stewards of what we have received. When we are concerned about what we need ,we should first turn to God. In the Gospel according to Matthew, Jesus tells us:

“Do not worry and say, ‘What are we to eat? Or what are we to drink, or what are we to wear? All these things the pagans seek. Your heavenly Father knows that you need them all. But first seek the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things will be given you besides.”

When we place God first in our lives, he will help us make good decisions about what we really need.

God provides our daily bread par excellence in the Bread of Life; Jesus Christ himself, body, blood, soul, and divinity in the Holy Eucharist. What more do we need than God himself? He is the source and summit of our lives.

“…and forgive us our sins for we ourselves forgive anyone in debt to us”

Forgiveness is essential for our spiritual, mental, and physical well being. There is no offense that may be committed against us that we should not forgive; unforgiveness, bitterness, resentment, hatred, etc., are all obstacles to the love of God. They enslave us to a life of misery – even to the point of affecting our physical health. If there is something we have not been able forgive, we can begin by asking God for the grace to desire to forgive because he commands us do so. He will liberate us from our enslavement.

In the Sacrament of Reconciliation, Jesus Christ himself forgives our sins through the priest and gives us the grace to make progress in our spiritual life. If we want to deepen our faith, we should participate in the Sacrament of Reconciliation once a month for the reason that we need the help that our Lord wants to give us through this sacrament.

“…and do not subject us to the final test.”

Our whole life is a process of purification. The closer we are to God through our worship, prayer, and sacramental life, the more aware we will be of how close he is to us in the challenges and difficulties that come our way. If we ask, God will give us the grace we need for every circumstance of our life. No matter how bad we have it on the worst day of our life, there will always be someone who has it worse and yet is still able to experience peace & joy – because of their faith and trust in God.

God’s Promise & Our Persistence

Jesus follows with a parable about the necessity of persistence in prayer; “I tell you, if he does not get up to give the visitor the loaves because of their friendship, he will get up to give him what ever he needs because of his persistence.”

We also must be persistent. Saint Monica prayed for her son Augustine’s conversion for sixteen years. Her perseverance was not only instrumental in her son becoming a great saint; it was also instrumental in Monica becoming a saint.

If we persevere in prayer, we can be confident that it will be answered. It may be answered in the way we hoped it would be, or we may discover that God has a different plan, more consistent with the coming of His kingdom.

This Gospel closes with a promise; “… how much more will the Father in heaven give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him?” If we ask, seek, knock and persevere, the Lord will send us the Holy Spirit to help us know his will – so that we remain close to him and be happy now and for all eternity. It’s a promise.


Deacon Tom Fox, K.H.S. is Co-Founder & Co-Director of Pilgrim Center of Hope with his wife, Mary Jane Fox. The two left their careers after a profound conversion experience and began working full-time in ministry at their parish in 1986. After several years and having impacted tens of thousands of families, the Foxes founded Pilgrim Center of Hope in 1993 as a response to the Church’s call for a New Evangelization. Deacon Tom is an invested member of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem, a Knight of the Holy Sepulchre.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

Do You Have An Intimate Relationship with God?

I recently attended a weekend conference on the Spirituality of the Cross, presented by the Missionaries of the Holy Spirit. A presentation called, “Do This in Memory of Me: A Process of Holiness,” by Fr. Vicente Monroy, MSpS, reminded me of how important mental prayer is to the spiritual life of every Christian.

Father Vicente pointed out that we need to focus more on God and not ourselves, and that instead of being obsessed with our own interests, we need to devote more time to growing in holiness. Father said, “A baptized Catholic who is not growing in holiness, is a failed Christian.”

He went on to say that our soul must be fed constantly, and that if a relationship with God is important to us, we will make the time and put in the work necessary to grow spiritually.

“I’m Too Busy / Too Distracted”

If this is your reaction to the idea of mental prayer, the good news is that mental prayer helps you to detach yourself from the world and from distraction in the same way that a good heart-to-heart conversation with your closest confidante helps you to regroup in the face of a crisis.

Wouldn’t you love to have those same type of intimate conversations with God? Wouldn’t you love to rest your head against the chest of Jesus – simply resting in the Lord – the way St. John did when he needed to be consoled and renewed?

Mental prayer takes us beyond our vocal prayer—where we often end up simply saying words instead of engaging in a conversation with Our Lord.

“The Father Is In; No Appointment Necessary”

For those who want to add mental prayer to their spiritual life, Jesus has prepared the way. Jesus set the example. He would withdraw from daily life, activities, and the demands of his ministry to be alone with his Father. Jesus invites us to do the same.

Getting Started

Begin with a loving heart and a reflective mind. Next, engage the three powers of the soul: your memory, your intellect, and your will.

Start small by adjusting your daily schedule by 15-minutes; getting up earlier and going to bed earlier. Mornings tend to be the best time, as they are often much quieter and peaceful.

Choose a spot where you can focus on a crucifix or a piece of sacred art. If you live near a church with a perpetual Adoration Chapel, you can spend your 15-minutes in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament.

Place yourself in God’s presence. Open up your heart & soul, surrendering yourself so you can receive God’s thoughts & promptings.

Come Prepared

As you prepare for mental prayer, remember the four C’s:

  • Concentrate – Bring along your Bible or the spiritual writings of a saint. This will help to guide you and keep your mind from wandering.
  • Consider – As you reflect on what you are reading, consider what God is saying to you through the Scriptural passage or saint’s words. Invite the Holy Spirit to work within you by increasing His fruits & gifts.
  • Converse – This is the time to have that heart-to-heart conversation with God. Offer up the day in thanksgiving. Over time, this will lead to your becoming more adept at waiting and listening for God’s response.
  • Commit – Make a resolution to grow in a particular virtue or to work on a vice or bad habit that may be hindering your spiritual growth. The resolution can also involve your committing to dealing with a difficult person or trying situation with more patience, understanding, and compassion.

Be Patient with Yourself

Mental prayer is a process much like the Walk to Emmaus where, with burning hearts, we are compelled to walk with Jesus, to listen to him, and finally to recognize him and become fully conscious of his presence within us.

When one has begun to meet Christ daily on this level of friendship, his entire relationship with to God will undergo a revolutionary alteration. Christ will no longer be a historical figure who lived some two thousand years ago. He will, instead, be a living, personal, knowable friend. – Peter Thomas Rohrbach, Conversations with Christ

Mental prayer is to your spiritual life, what an engine is to a car, it is crucial to your being able to fully experience God’s love & wisdom. St. Teresa of Avila called mental prayer the “royal highway to heaven,” a journey which leads us to meditation and eventually into contemplation.

Our Meet the Master mornings of prayer and reflection are an excellent way to introduce you to mental prayer. Consider joining us. We invite you to visit us at our peaceful place in northwest San Antonio.


Robert V. Rodriguez is Public Relations & Outreach Assistant for Pilgrim Center of Hope. He combines a passion for the Catholic faith together with years of professional experience as a TV news journalist, video producer, and PR/marketing specialist. Robert also serves as Chairman for our annual “Master, I Want to See” Catholic Men’s Conference.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

Do I Know the Holy Spirit?

The Forgotten Person

Other than when you make the sign of the Cross or pray the Apostles’ Creed, how often do you mention or talk to the Holy Spirit?

If you said, not very often… well, you are not alone. The vast majority of Christians do not have an intimate relationship with the Holy Spirit. For me, that relationship didn’t really take shape until I was in my 40s.

Since that time, I have had more epiphanies or eureka moments, where all of a sudden a light goes on and something or everything makes sense. I have learned to be open to the promptings of the Holy Spirit, and also take every major decision in my life to prayer that involves going to the Holy Spirit to discern and discover what God wants me to do. What will be most pleasing to God?

St. Josemaria Escrivá had a special devotion to the Holy Spirit, because according to Blessed Alvaro del Portillo, St. Josemaria felt that the Third Person of the Blessed Trinity was not known, had been forgotten, and was neglected.

Embracing the Spirit

As we prepare to celebrate Pentecost, the descent of the Holy Spirit on the Apostles and our Mother Mary (this coming Sunday), now is the perfect time to embrace the Holy Spirit and grow in relationship to him.

Our peace truly lies in the promise of Christ, which is the gift of the Holy Spirit dwelling in us; a gift which as Catholics, we received together with the Father and the Son at our Baptism. Know, too, that the Sacrament of Confirmation intensifies that presence.

It’s not too late to join in a novena to the Holy Spirit (which began on Ascension Thursday this past week), or perhaps you can learn and recite St. Josemaria’s Prayer to the Holy Spirit:

Come, O Holy Spirit: enlighten my understanding to know your commands: strengthen my heart against the wiles of the enemy; inflame my will…

I have heard your voice and I don’t want to Harden my heart by resisting, by saying: later…tomorrow.

Nunc corps! Now! Lest there be no tomorrow for me! O, Spirit of truth and wisdom, Spirit of understanding and counsel, Spirit of joy and peace! I want what you want, I want it because you want it, I want it as you want it, I want it when you want it. Amen 

When we receive the Holy Spirit into our hearts, he will help us and guide us to the truth. It is the Holy Spirit that helps us to know ourselves better, which strengthens our hearts and open our eyes. With the Holy Spirit you can do all things in Christ. Life without the Holy Spirit leaves us wandering in the dessert.

I encourage you to go the Catechism of the Catholic Church and look up numbers:

  • 697 – Symbols of the Holy Spirit
  • 1848 – the Consoler
  • 2671 – Come, Holy Spirit

Stronger with the Spirit

It was only after the Apostles received the Holy Spirit that they were able to leave the sanctuary of the Upper Room and go out into the world to spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ, without any fear of torture or death. We can rejoice in knowing that at Pentecost, the Paschal Mystery was completed and fulfilled. Pentecost is considered the birth of the Church.

Even if we may enjoy a relationship with Jesus Christ, he is always calling us closer and deeper into intimacy with himself and his Holy Spirit.

I leave you with the words of St. John of Avila, who said about devotion to the Holy Spirit:

However sad a soul may be, he (the Holy Spirit) is sufficient to console it. However worthless, he can make it valuable. However lukewarm, he can put fire into it. However weak, he can strengthen it. However lacking in prayerfulness, he can aflame it with ardent devotion.


Robert V. Rodriguez is Public Relations & Outreach Assistant for Pilgrim Center of Hope. He combines a passion for the Catholic faith together with years of professional experience as a TV news journalist, video producer, and PR/marketing specialist. Robert also serves as Chairman for our annual “Master, I Want to See” Catholic Men’s Conference.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.