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Pruning My Own Branches

The Gospel for the 5th Sunday of Easter concerned the Vine and the Branches. We will only have Life if we are a part of the Vine. However, the Gospel also spoke about a vinedresser needing to prune those branches that do not bear fruit, that they may bear more fruit. See, John 15:1-2. Here’s the problem I have: can I correctly identify those branches IN ME that are either not bearing fruit or are not bearing enough fruit? How do I do that? At this point, we may be thinking, “I already feel like I have pretty good fruits.” But, then, I’m not the vinedresser, am I?

Practical Ways We Can Be Pruned

For starters, those of us who are lucky enough to have a spiritual advisor are already on the right path because if we are candid, that spiritual advisor can help us identify those aspects of what we do, how we think, who we are. But most of us do not have a spiritual advisor. What then?

The Sacrament of Reconciliation is a wonderful way to air out those problems that prick our consciences and tell us that we’re going in the wrong direction. Before we go to Confession, though, we can self-examine by reading through an examination of conscience online or in a booklet to start us down the path with a very good flashlight. How about telling a fellow, devout Catholic friend how I feel about certain people or certain things, that can help us find those pesky dark corners of our lives that need cleaning out?

A man was once trying to make his Lent a successful one, so he asked his wife if she would write down those things about him that needed improvement. She replied by saying “There isn’t enough paper.” Some of us may feel that way at times, but we have to remember that Jesus is Mercy itself. He understands our humanity but also wants us to progress along the road to holiness. We are, after all, called to be saints, right?

Still, needing that flashlight? Read Scripture. Study your favorite parables. The parables are the flashlight Jesus uses to shine light upon those parts of our human nature that cause us to succeed or to fail. The parables are often as much about virtue as they are about the weaker sides of our nature.

These examples of virtue can be found in the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Do we strive to practice, and therefore strengthen, those gifts? Are we allowing the Holy Spirit to work within us? Those gifts are charity (or love), joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, long-suffering, gentleness, faith, modesty, self-control, and chastity. (Gal. 5:22)

Gifts of the Holy Spirit and Fruits of the Holy Spirit

So what’s the difference between the gifts of the Holy Spirit and the fruits of the Holy Spirit? Well, the gifts are the virtues, or the seeds, which produce the fruits of the Holy Spirit. “Fruits” are another word for “actions”. So, allowing the seeds of the gifts of the Holy Spirit to take root in us will give rise to the actions resulting from those gifts. Our actions will be born out of the seeds, the virtues, that we cultivated.

Other gifts/virtues/seeds of the Holy Spirit:

  • Witnessing Power (Acts 1:8)
  • Mutual Encouragement (Romans 1:11-12)
  • Ministry, Romans 12:7; Teaching, Romans (12:7)
  • Encouraging, Contributing, Leadership, Showing Mercy, and Spirit of Unity (Romans 15:5)
  • Wisdom and Knowledge (I Corinthians 12:8)
  • Healing (I Corinthians 12:9)
  • Prophesying, Miraculous Powers, Discernment, Tongues, Interpretation (I Corinthians 12:10)
  • Administration (I Corinthians 12:28)
  • Revelation (Ephesians 1:17)
One Last Recommendation

Finally, Adoration before the Eucharistic Jesus, with our spiritual or holy reading. When we take this sort of reading as we spend time with Jesus, the Holy Spirit is there to guide and encourage us along the Way. Choose books and themes from a reliable Catholic source, as we can be misled by the many authors who have decided that the Magisterium is theirs to change. There are so many books and videos that help us to meditate on how to get to where Our Lord wants us to go. Our reading can be a wonderful source for our self-examination, helping us to see ourselves as God sees us, and making those changes and adjustments that are needed.

These are just some ways to “prune” ourselves. Our work now will help us to continue pruning with the new tools we have acquired that are right for the job. Choose any one of these, and soon you will see yourself blossoming abundantly like an apple tree in Spring.


Victor Negrón is a husband, father, grandfather, practicing lawyer, former judge, past-President of the San Antonio Catholic Lawyers Guild, lay evangelist, Board Member of Pilgrim Center of Hope and A Woman’s Haven. Judge Negrón became Board Certified in Family Law in 1987. As a lay evangelist, Victor has served as a leader for Eucharistic Adoration of San Antonio, Inc., and has been involved with Pilgrim Center of Hope’s evangelizing activities since its early years – formerly as emcee for the Catholic Men’s Conference, and currently as a member of the PCH Board of Directors.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

Divine Mercy: Where Hope And Healing Are Found

On June 7, 1997, on a visit to the Shrine of Divine Mercy, in Krakow, Poland, St. John Paul II shared these thoughts on the Divine Mercy: 

Those who sincerely say ‘Jesus, I trust in You’ will find comfort in all their anxieties and fears. 

There is nothing more man needs than Divine Mercy – that love which is benevolent, which is compassionate, which raises man above his weakness to the infinite heights to the holiness of God.” 

To him, these were not just words or a nice sentiment to share with those in attendance. He is the epitome of living a life filled with Divine Mercy. Before the age the 21, he had experienced the loss of his siblings and both parents. His brother passed away after treating a patient with scarlet fever, which was at an epidemic level at the time. On May 13, 1981, Mehmet Ali Agca attempted to assassinate Pope John Paul II in St. Peter’s Square. Praise God, he survived the attempt. In 1983, he visited Agca and conveyed his forgiveness to him. It was an earthly display of the merciful heart of Jesus. Pope John Paull II lived a life soaked in Divine Mercy. It was no coincidence that he passed away on the eve of Divine Mercy Sunday, 2005. 

We often go through life, defining ourselves by our worst sin. This can continually keep us down. God loves us with his divine mercy. Every part of us that feels condemned, our Heavenly Father wants to turn into a fountain of life.  

Hope and Healing

In times where I feel fearful or uncertain, the simple prayer of Jesus, I trust in you brings me peace. This is a peace that can only be provided by invoking the holy name of Jesus and placing my complete trust in him. In my 40 years of life, I have experienced a sudden loss of a loved one, a foot amputation, endured End Stage Renal Failure, dialysis, and blessed with a Kidney Transplant from a Living DonorThrough these moments, I felt pain, sadness, anxiety, fear of my own death, as well as a feeling of blessed beyond my worthiness. In each of these moments, Jesus, I trust in you helped me rise above and proceed without fear. It has never failed me.  

I will share one of these moments with you. The morning of my Kidney Transplant, I was asked to check-in at the hospital at 9:00am. It was midday when they called me to the back area to be prepped for surgery. For one reason or another, I was in the Pre-Op area for a longer period of time than expectedI was there long enough for several family members and friends to visit and pray with me. Then the moment arrived, the nurse informed my wife and I, it was time. As I said goodbye to my wife, I glanced at the clock as the nurse wheeled me towards the operating room, it was 3:00pm. I thought to myself, Jesus, I trust in you. As the anesthesiologist began to administer the cocktail of medication into my veins, I thought to myself, Jesus, I trust in you. Thanks be to God; the transplant was a success! I learned later, that when my wife walked back to the waiting area, my parents and friends were already praying the Chaplet of the Divine Mercy for my intention.    

It has now been 15 months since my transplant. Looking back through the physical suffering and uncertainty, I am thanking for it. These experiences have brought me closer to God and to love him with all that I have. I recall the words St. Faustina wrote in her Diary (entry 57)

Suffering is a great grace; through suffering the soul becomes like the Savior; in suffering love becomes crystallized; the greater the suffering the purer the love.

Call To Action

God is calling you to be an ambassador of mercy. I invite you to open your heart to the person you resist the most with open hands of faith and mercy.

Why you may ask?

God wants more for you.

How could I do this, you may ask? Try this simple pray before you do so:

Lord, help me receive your mercy, so I can bring it to the world. Amen


Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life.

Jason Nunez is the Media Production Assistant for Pilgrim Center of Hope, having served at the apostolate since November of 2020.

Jesus, A Mighty Name! | Journey with Jesus

ENCORE: Gethsemane & The Agony in the Garden

Travel along with Mary Jane Fox & Ed Batis to the foot of the Mount of Olives and discover the Garden of Gethsemane. Such a place still exists, the place where Jesus, Son of God spent time.

This program will address these four points:

  • The significance of the Garden of Gethsemane
  • Why was this a place of rest for Jesus and His Apostles?
  • What does it mean to watch and pray?
  • How can we draw strength from our Lord’s suffering?

Jewel for the Journey:
The first end I propose in our daily work is to do the will of God; secondly, to do it in the manner he wills it; and thirdly to do it because it is his will. – Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton


WHERE to TUNE IN:

Live – Wed., March 24 @ 8:00 PM

  • Guadalupe Radio Network (South/Central Texas Stations)

… Listen to the archived audio recording on our website, ASAP!

Visit PilgrimCenterofHope.org for more information.


A Closer Look at Gethsemane:


Where is Gethsemane?

Where is

Hope for Family In Pandemic | Journey with Jesus

The Blessing of Turning our Why into What

What is your response when you don’t believe God answered your prayer?

Do you humbly respond,

“Lord, You know what is best for me. I trust that You have a better plan for my good.”

Or . . . do you respond more often like Naaman, the highly esteemed and respected army commander suffering from leprosy that we read about in today’s Mass reading from the second Book of Kings (5:1-15)?

After hearing from his wife through her Israelite slave that a prophet of Israel can cure him, Naaman asks permission of his master to go and see the healer and prophet Elisha. He travels into a foreign land with his entourage bringing gifts to impress the king so as to gain access to the prophet.

In other words . . . he goes all out in hope his efforts will bring about a healing.

When Elisha refuses to see him, sending him a message instead, Naaman has a tantrum and yells,

“I thought that he would surely come out to me and stand there to call on the name of the LORD his God, and would move his hand over the place, and thus cure the leprous spot!”

Naaman then “turned about in anger and left,” (2 King 5:12).

Sound familiar?

How often do we expect God to come as we say and when we say?

Naaman was an army commander and therefore expected people to do what he said. Aren’t we all a bit like that?  We expect control of our situations. When God does not respond as we want, we are easily tempted to question His motives and fall into the sin of pride. We become angry and demand why, “Why did you not heal/fix this?” which can be translated, “Why are You not doing what I tell You to do when I tell You to do it?”

What we can learn from Naaman is that God wants so much more than just healing Naaman of his leprosy, He wants Naaman for His own. God desires to be seen and known by Naaman. Had it been as Naaman expected, he could have assumed his healing was due to his own efforts in visiting the prophet.

He would have been healed, but never encountered God, the Source of all healing.

It is normal for us to do the same. We think praying x-number of Rosaries, keeping the Sacraments and/or offering our devotional prayers regularly will secure all the blessings we ask for. They are necessary to be sure, but if our attitude is one of control, “If I do this or that I will get what I want,” we may find ourselves stomping mad like Naaman.

What should we do?

Wonderful advice I received is to replace our demands on God to answer our ‘whys’ with an invitation to come into our ‘whats.’

Here’s an example of a prayer of what: “Lord I know You are Good and You want the best for me. I don’t understand what You are doing here.  I feel like You have abandoned me, but I know You never abandon us, so what am I not seeing? Come into this place where I hurt, where I am so angry, and please help me to understand what You are working in this situation.”

This simple change of ‘why” into ‘what’ takes God off the defensive and into the reality of who He is. I have never known the prayer of ‘what’ to fail. I may not get what I expect, but I receive so much more. I receive God’s Presence with me, bringing His light, His warmth, His consolation, and an eventual answer to my prayer that always heals, fixes or restores in ways so much better than I could have imagined!

In surrendering his expectation, Naaman learns the same. He returns at the advice of his servants and obeys the instruction of Elisha receiving the full healing of his leprosy and best of all . . . God Himself!  Naaman says,

“Now I know that there is no God in all the earth, except in Israel!” (2 Kings 5:15).

Naaman’s conversion in faith was so profound this foreigner and Gentile won entry into Jewish Scripture, and 500 years later, recognition on the lips of God. In rebuking the people of His hometown of Nazareth for refusing to believe Jesus as a prophet, our Lord says in the Gospel of Luke (4:27), “Again, there were lepers in Israel during the time of Elisha the prophet; yet no one of them was cleansed, but only Naaman the Syrian.”


Nan Balfour is a grateful Catholic whose greatest desire is to make our Lord Jesus more loved. She seeks to accomplish this through her vocation to womanhood, marriage, motherhood, and as a writer, speaker and events coordinator for Pilgrim Center of Hope.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

St. Patrick’s Purgatory, Ireland

Take a spiritual journey with Deacon Tom and Mary Jane Fox to St. Patrick’s Purgatory in Lough Derg, Ireland. Today, it is Europe’s oldest pilgrimage destination offering peace and tranquility. Over the last 1500 years, pilgrims have been coming here from throughout Europe for this extraordinary spiritual experience. Tune in as we learn:

  • What do St. Patrick and purgatory have to do with each other?
  • Who would visit such an Island named Purgatory?
  • What if people I know don’t believe in Purgatory –what do I say?
  • Much, much more

Listen to this program now:

Jewel For The Journey:

By Christ’s Passion, our weakness was cured. By His Resurrection death was conquered. Still, we have to be sorrowful for the world, as well as joyful in the Lord, sorrowful in penance, joyful in gratitude. – St. Ambrose of Milan

The Prayer of St. Gertrude the Great for the Souls in Purgatory:

Eternal Father, I offer Thee the Most Precious Blood of Thy Divine Son, Jesus, in union with the Masses said throughout the world today, for all the Holy Souls in Purgatory, for sinners everywhere, for sinners in the universal Church, those in my own home, and within my family. Amen.

Payer for the Souls in Purgatory:

Eternal Rest grant unto them O Lord, may their souls and the souls of the faithful departed rest in peace.
Amen.

Image Credit: CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Hope Gets Us Through the Desert

Judean Desert

The desert.  It’s hot, unbearable, and extreme. Two years ago, I was blessed to have gone on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land with the Pilgrim Center of Hope.  From Galilee, we traveled by motorcoach through the Judean Desert to Jerusalem. The heat of the Judean Desert was hotter than any south Texas summer day!   After leaving the Jordan River, we drove through the desert to Jericho.  As we drove, I stared out the window at the horizon that looked so desolate, hot, and dry.  It was mysterious and scary. I wondered what it might have been like for Jesus during his 40 days in the desert being tempted by the devil.

“Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the desert to be tempted by the devil. He fasted for forty days and forty nights, and afterwards he was hungry.”  Matthew 4: 1-2

We humans would be uneasy with the idea of being in the desert, alone and powerless against the elements and the unknown.  Although my example is literal, we also have figurative desert experiences.  Perhaps it is an illness, a loss, a temptation, or any unbearable situation that makes us feel completely alone, uncomfortable, or that we simply can’t control.  This is where hope comes in.

What is Hope?

“Hope is the theological virtue by which we desire the kingdom of heaven and eternal life as our happiness, placing our trust in Christ’s promises and relying not on our own strength, but on the help of the grace of the Holy Spirit… (Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 1817)

“…it keeps man from discouragement; it sustains him during times of abandonment; it opens up his heart in expectation of eternal beatitude… (CCC, no. 1818)

A few years ago, my husband and I discovered we were expecting our third child.  At our first sonogram visit, the doctor told us that there was an abnormal image.  He stated that it could be a spot in the image itself or an indication that our child could have lung or other developmental issues.  We’d see a specialist every two weeks during the pregnancy to monitor the baby.  Each day my husband and I talked to each other about it, we talked to the baby, and we prayed–always trusting that this was God’s will and not ours.  So many times, each day I asked God to get us through the pregnancy and to care for our baby; we hoped with all our might.  Through the grace of God and many prayers, the abnormal spot was gone and never came back.  All tests were normal and we went on to deliver our third, healthy, beautiful baby boy.

Our hope was what truly carried us through the pregnancy. Hope gets us all through our own deserts.

As Christians, we are equipped with the virtue of hope.  Our hope is like a help-line where we can humbly ask our Lord to help us persevere through our desert.  Hope nourishes our soul to get us through a day, an hour, and sometimes a minute at a time.

Call to Action

We can never avoid our desert nor should we want to because crossing the desert strengthens our faith.  It reinforces our trust in God, especially in times when we don’t know where the next step will take us.  Below are some practical first steps that have helped me find hope, that will hopefully help you, too:

  • Pray often.  It could start with a rosary, a chaplet or simply having a conversation with God. He loves you and wants to hear from you often.
  • When worry sets in, offer it up.  “Offer it up”, a topic worthy of its own blog, is essentially uniting our pain or suffering to Jesus’ suffering on the cross for the salvation of souls.  It’s fascinating, read about it!
  • Help others who are in their desert.  In other words, offer hope.  You can do this by praying for them or supporting them in a meaningful way.

With the gift of stigmata and as the patron saint of stress relief, St. Pio of Pietreclina, better known as “Padre Pio”, gave the best encouragement in his motto that we all could follow:
“Pray, hope, and don’t worry.”


Christina Campos is a blessed Catholic wife and mother. Each day brings adventurous memories and so many reasons to be thankful to God. She enjoys volunteering and contributing to the special mission of the Pilgrim Center of Hope.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.

Finding Freedom through Fasting. Catholicism Live Feminine Faith First special edition show. How will fasting help you grow in faith? Tune-in to our Feminine Faith edition of Catholicism Live! March 7, 2017 at 11 am central standard time.

Finding Freedom through Fasting

We talk about setting your Lenten goals with a focus on fasting. Plus, we’ll introduce you to Blessed Esperanza de Jesus, AND give you a Spa Moment for your Soul!

Tips for Living Lent “Entering the Lenten Season” written by Deacon Tom and Mary Jane Fox

Mother church gives us the gift of the Liturgical Calendar for many reasons, most especially to remind us of the Salvation Plan of God and to help us, her faithful to be united with the Triune God. For instance, during Lent, we are asked to live the three pillars of the Lenten Season – Almsgiving, Fasting and Prayer.

The following are a few ideas or suggestions you can consider doing during the Lenten Season.

  • When you start your day – implore the grace of God to help you see His love for you today.   “Father, Son and Holy Spirit – help me see your love for me today.”
  • Implore your Guardian Angel to assist you throughout the day. Pray the traditional prayer to our Guardian Angel or simply ask your Guardian Angel to walk with you and help you from falling (literally), to help you remain focus.
  • Pray! Make an effort to spend at least 10-15 minutes daily in concentrated prayer.
  • Ask Mary to help you in all you do. Pray the Rosary daily! It only takes 15 minutes. There are so many Rosary meditations available for you to use.
  • Read the Word of God – the Bible. The Word of God is alive and refreshes the soul, because it is The Word! A suggestion would be to read the daily gospel.
  • Fast! Fasting can be food or a meal. However, fasting from something that is keeping you from spending a few minutes with God in prayer. For example: limit time watching television.
  • Almsgiving – collect a few cents/dollars a week and place them in a box/bowl. After the 40 days, you will be surprised what you have collected. Then give this collection to a ministry serving the poor.
  • Read a book that will help you in your spiritual growth.
  • Make an effort to schedule a Holy Hour once a week. OR sometime in silent prayer before Jesus in His Eucharistic Presence. Do not be tempted to bring lots of reading material during this Hour. This Holy Hour is your special time with Jesus, the Son of God! Speak briefly, listen and listen!
  • If married: pray with your spouse daily. Before you sleep –pray the Memorare or other favorite prayer.
  • Pray the Act of Contrition daily, especially before you sleep!
  • Go to Confession. Receive this Sacrament of Reconciliation and healing. Try to schedule this Sacrament once a month.
  • Watch a religious movie such as “The Passion of Christ” by M. Gibson. Or the “Ten Commandments”, a classic.
  • Read a story of a Saint. There are so many! Their lives witnessed courage and humility.
  • Attend one of the spiritual events sponsored by the Pilgrim Center of Hope or a parish mission.

Where is fasting found in the Bible?

Matthew 6:16When you fast, do not look gloomy like the hypocrites. They neglect their appearance, so that they may appear to others to be fasting. Amen, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, so that you may not appear to others to be fasting, except to your Father who is hidden. And your Father who sees what is hidden will repay you.
Galatians 5:17For the flesh has desires against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the flesh; these are opposed to each other, so that you may not do what you want.
Romans 7:15 – What I do, I do not understand. For I do not do what I want, but I do what I hate.
Romans 7:5For when we were in the flesh, our sinful passions, awakened by the law, worked in our members to bear fruit for death.
Romans 7:24Miserable one that I am! Who will deliver me from this mortal body?
Romans 8:4-6So that the righteous decree of the law might be fulfilled in us, who live not according to the flesh but according to the spirit.  For those who live according to the flesh are concerned with the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the spirit with the things of the spirit.  The concern of the flesh is death, but the concern of the spirit is life and peace.
Romans 8:13For if you live according to the flesh, you will die, but if by the spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live.
Galatians 5:24Now those who belong to Christ [Jesus] have crucified their flesh with its passions and desires.
1 Corinthians 9:27No, I drive my body and train it, for fear that, after having preached to others, I myself should be disqualified.

What do the Saints say about fasting?

St Peter Chrysologus – “Fasting is the soul of prayer; mercy is the lifeblood of fasting. Let no one try to separate them; they cannot be separated. If you have only one of them or not all together, you have nothing. So if you pray, fast; if you fast, show mercy; if you want your petition to be heard, hear the petition of others.”  

St. Basil the Great – “Fasting gives birth to prophets and strengthens the powerful; fasting makes lawgivers wise. Fasting is a good safeguard for the soul, a steadfast companion for the body, a weapon for the valiant, and a gymnasium for athletes. Fasting repels temptations, anoints unto piety; it is the comrade of watchfulness and the artificer of chastity. In war it fights bravely, in peace it teaches stillness.”

St. Jose Maria Escriva – “The world admires only spectacular sacrifice, because it does not realize the value of sacrifice that is hidden and silent.”

Is It Selfish to Ask God for Healing?

Someone told me they thought that asking God for healing for themselves was being selfish. On the contrary, God wants to heal us, because He loves us, and knows us more than we know ourselves! How is that possible? He procreated with our parents and gave us life when we were in our mother’s womb. He knows us, every single detail about our being. God sent His Son, Christ Jesus to live among us, die for us, and give us Eternal Life the ultimate healing through his resurrection.   

Examples of Healing From Scripture 

We know the stories in the New Testament, how Jesus healed the blind, the lame, the sick. Sometimes it took a simple word, a mere look or touch from Christ. One thing is clear in all these stories: Christ healed those who wanted his healing, those who trusted in him.  We may not think about that. We may think that we do not exist in the eyes of God, or that he doesn’t know our needs. Christ Jesus said:  …Behold, I cast out demons and I perform healings today and tomorrow… (Luke 13:32)

In Hebrews 13:8, we read:   

“Jesus Christ is the same, yesterday, today and forever. “

Two Healing Stories of Hope

Jesus continues to heal. Here are two stories among many I have heard from people healed by God to encourage you and give you hope.   

A young mother lost her 1-year-old daughter in a drowning accident. She was devasted and angry at God. As time went on, she realized the emptiness of the loss of her daughter, the loss of hope caused her anxiety and anguish. She had enough! Late one night, she felt compelled to call out to God. She began to weep and as she wept, she cried out:

“God, help me! God, help me! I need help!”

The next day, she happened to meet someone who asked her if she needed prayer. She was taken by surprise! She had just cried out to God the previous night! She was renewed in her faith in God and began a journey of healing. 

My father suffered from severe neuropathy in this legs and feet; so much so, his pain increased during the night preventing him from having a night’s sleep. He and my mother went on pilgrimage to Lourdes, France; where Mary, the Mother of God appeared to a young girl, Bernadette in 1858. Since then, it has been a pilgrimage destination for thousands, and through the healing power of God and Mary’s intercession; many have experienced healing. While on pilgrimage, they spent a lot of time in prayer asking for healing while discovering the richness of their Catholic Faith. Upon their return home from their pilgrimage, my father discovered he was completely healed of neuropathy!   

Christ heals our broken bodies, but He also heals our broken spirits, our broken hearts. No, it is not selfish to ask for healing. Do not let anything stop you from approaching Christ Jesus for healing. He hears our prayers raised to him from the depths of our hearts, He will answer our prayer, all according to His holy will and in the perfect time. We must remain faithful and trust in Him, who loves you.   

Lord Jesus, I believe you are the Son of God, the Divine Physician.  I come to you as I am, broken and needing your healing.   Jesus, I trust in you.  Amen. 


Mary Jane Fox, D.H.S. is Co-Founder & Co-Director of Pilgrim Center of Hope with her husband, Deacon Tom Fox. The two left their careers after a profound conversion experience and began working full-time in ministry at their parish in 1986. After several years and having impacted tens of thousands of families, the Foxes founded Pilgrim Center of Hope in 1993 as a response to the Church’s call for a New Evangelization. Mary Jane is an invested member of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem, a Dame of the Holy Sepulchre.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. See what’s happening & let us journey with you! Visit PilgrimCenterOfHope.org.